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Chicken Stock or Bone Broth

I started making Chicken Stock a few years ago after I had a very

 

 

disappointing trip to the grocery store.  They were out of chicken stock so I

 

 

bought broth and it was pathetic with no smell or flavor.  I had made stock off

 

 

and on for a long time but making TIME was the problem.   

I use a lot of stock (beef and chicken) in my cooking so I made it a habit to set

 

 

aside time, usually once a month, to make stock for our household.

 

 

 

 

One of the best things about making your own stock is that you

 

 

 

control the amount of salt that goes in.  I do use bouillon sometimes

 

 

 

but since it does contain a lot of salt, I try to avoid it.

About the Ingredients. . .

 

  Chicken bones-The amount of ingredients below is for one and a

 

 

 

    half pounds of bones or carcasses.  Most grocery stores will sell you

 

 

 

   chicken bones or give them to you free if you give them advanced

 

 

 

   notice.  I also save the carcasses from roasted chickens or turkeys,

 

 

 

   place them in the freezer until I'm ready for them.  Do not use

 

 

 

   chicken pieces with a lot of meat on the bones; most of the flavor

 

 

 

   and goodness comes from the bones.  Plus the meat doesn't taste

 

 

 

   really good after it has cooked for a long time.

 

•  Celery-I use one stalk of cleaned and rough chopped celery

 

•  Carrots-Same as the celery but I use one medium carrot.

•  Onion-One half of a medium onion, rough chopped

•  Water-Use filtered if possible, especially if your water has lots of

 

 

 

   chlorine.  It does affect the taste and the final results.

•  Vinegar-It helps to draw more flavor and goodness from the bones;

 

 

 

   you won't taste it either.

•  Sea salt-I use one teaspoon per 1½ pound batch.

•  Cracked pepper-¼ tsp per 1½ pound batch.

Did you know that Bone Broth is not only nutritious but chocked full of 

 

 

 

vitamins and minerals.  It's also been proven that it contains amino

 

 

 

acids which help your immune system, repairs your body, and

 

 

 

supports your skin.  Not all bone broth is equal though and it depends

 

 

 

on the amount quality of the bones.

You can see the layer of chicken fat (schmaltz) in the picture above. 

 

 

 

Once it's cold (picture below), I will remove it and freeze in small

 

 

 

portions to use at a later time.

You don't have to remove the fat; it has great flavor.  After removing

 

 

 

the chicken and vegetables with my spider strainer, I  use strainer

 

 

 

with a handle like a scoop to get out the large bits and then this

 

 

 

strainer to remove the rest, leaving a beautiful broth.  You don't have

 

 

 

to do the  fine straining like I did; it depends on how you intend to use

 

 

 

your broth.

Sometimes I like to use the broth in clear soups, like a consommé.

Ramen soup make with our Chicken Bone Broth.
Basic ingredients for our homemade Chicken Stock.
Fresh Chicken Stock ready to be refrigerated.
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Made in USA
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Chicken Stock or Bone Broth Recipe

Ingredients

•  1½ lbs chicken or turkey bones or carcass* (adjust to what you have)

•  1 stalk of celery, cleaned and rough chopped

•  1 medium carrot, cleaned and rough chopped

•  Water to cover by 3 inches, regardless of the amount in the pot

•  2 tsp vinegar

•  1 tsp sea salt

•  ¼ tsp cracked pepper

You will need a large pot with a lid; it needs to have a 3-inch

 

 

headspace after adding the water.

Instructions

1.   Place all the ingredients in a large pot.  Cover with water; start

 

   

     cooking on high; turn to low when you see it starting to boil; top with

 

   

     the lid.

 

2.  Cook for a minimum of 12 hours; 18 is better; 24 is best.

 

3.  Remove the bones and vegetables when done.  Using a fine sieve,

 

 

     strain all the stock into a bowl or jars.  Cover and let sit until it can be

 

 

     refrigerated.  I have found this to be the best way; the

 

 

     fat** (schmaltz) is easier to remove this way.

  *If you are using a carcass, it's best to "break it up' before putting in

 

 

    the pot.  

**I remove the fat and put it in a jar in the fridge (1 week) or freeze it in

 

 

   2 Tbsp amounts (6 months).

   

 

• The chicken fat is great for gravy, carmelized onions-just

 

 

   about anywhere you would use butter.  I've even used it in

 

 

   making biscuits!

    

 

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